Category Archives: Student work

student work

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Three Weeks/One School

We have been working with some new formats the last couple of years.  Originally, Museum School was unofficially limited to no more that two classes from one school within one school year.  This had practical reasoning behind it – reach as many schools, teachers and students as possible within the available 28 week year.  Open Minds serves two purposes, student learning and teacher professional development and in the early days, the shotgun approach spread this through the community.   Well, 20 years later, schools have changed, the methodology in the classroom now mirrors (for the most part) what we are trying to accomplish in the museum – student driven, inquiry based learning, and most schools have a teacher in their population who has participated in Open Minds.  So, is it time for us to change? – probably! 

We have had more schools apply with three or more classes all part of the same learning team – partly due to demographics, our city is growing,  and partly due to school organization.  I find working with a team of teachers fantastic!  It gives teachers with more experience with Open Minds the opportunity to mentor new teachers and entire grades in schools the opportunity to share their Museum experience.  More opportunities means more connections within their entire year. 

Our final three weeks were with three grade six classes.  The teachers planned their weeks together and shared their resources.  For us, it was eye opening to see three different approaches used within one framework.  Each week, even though the programs were identical, was completely unique but maintained a common thread to carry back to the school.  I think this approach, shared experiences molded to the individual student community and teaching style, worked brilliantly.

 The weeks all started with an object based looking activity that challenged the students to look deeply.  A “Welcome to Your Week” type of program!

The following day, building on looking deeply, the students participated in a writing workshop with writer and curator, Dennis Slater.  Now, they were asked to not only look deeply but to write a piece of fiction based on the object they chose.

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Building on this theme of story within object/art, the next day was an immersion into our gallery of arctic themed art to do some poetry writing and art making.

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 A trip behind the scenes into our collections to look at and hear the stories of a few artifacts continues to reinforce the importance of object as story holder on the second to last day of the week.  Students worked individually in the afternoon, seeking out artifacts that interested them and finding their stories.

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The last day, using all of the skills from the week ahead, the students used clues from objects to create an imaginary culture and debate the impact to their culture when they are contacted by a different culture.  The conversation that this initiated was an excellent kicking off point for their year’s big Idea, “What makes a global citizen?”  I think the stories these students found in objects and the importance of preserving the artifacts will affect their view on global citizenship.  Cool weeks!

The final word goes to a grade six student,

“Museum school was awesome. We got to put on a Knight’s helmet and gauntlet. We got to spend a whole morning in the Warriors’ gallery, where we had to find any weapon in the gallery that wasn’t a fire-arm and write a story about it.  On Thursday, we went into storage, we had to take a special staff elevator up to the 7th floor. Once we got there, Marnie took our group to Patty the dog. Patty was a World War I dog who went with soldiers in Canada all the way to France and helped out the soldiers.  Patty was most likely killed by gases, was stuffed, and sent back to Canada where he wound up at the Glenbow.  Then we went to hold a one handed 30 pound cavalry mace. In the afternoon we went to Mavericks, where we had to write a story on one of the vehicles.  I chose the Curtiss Jenny 4 airplane and wrote an awesome story.  In museum school, I learned about Canada’s history, about the pioneers, about European history with weapons, ancient Japan’s history and the First Nations.  I learned all about the hardships of life in the olden days, and what it took to be a knight. I would go back because there’s so much stuff that I didn’t get a chance to see, and I want to see it all.” 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Student journal - reflecting

Before, During and After Museum School

 At the end of October, CC/OM held a workshop for teachers that are visiting sites this year at Briar Hill School.  Mike West, who was at Museum School in September shared his process for skill building and creating a culture of learning within his class.  Two other teachers from Briar Hill were at Museum School as well, Celeste Ruff and Leslie LeVesconte.  This was a fantastic experience for us because we got to see the impact of the week at Glenbow on three classes. 

Pre-Work was a vital part of each class.  The learning and thinking was made visible up and down the halls and in the classrooms.  Click on the images to make them larger.Pre Work Pre Work What is a museum? Pre work Beginning to think about...

Skills were practiced.

Pre Work - looking at art

At the Museum, the learning was again made visible.  FullSizeRender Artifact whispers

To document their learning, students returned to their journals and drew from their experience to create multi-dimensional representations of their learning.  Expectations were clearly stated.

Rubric for Journal

 

Journal rubric

 The work that was, and still is, being produced clearly demonstrates student centered learning that shows they were engaged and challenged to think deeply.

Journal sample JOW poem1

Open Minds See, Think, Wonder - Go Deeper

Open Minds See, Think, Wonder – Go Deeper

Student journal - reflecting

 Thank you to Briar Hill grade 3/4′s for three fantastic weeks! 

 

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This Week in Museum School: May 2014

May 16, 2014

When students come to Glenbow we often see a remarkable transition.  Ideally, by day three of their week, the students have left the “Look! Look! Look!” of their initial distracted excitement behind and become true explorers; slowing down and looking and thinking deeply.  This week, we were constantly amazed at how much we learned from a group of grade 4 students!

On Wednesday, we looked at objects and learned what it was to be a Curator.  The students, in groups, are given a tray of 7-10 objects pulled from a variety of our collections, intentionally put together to make it difficult to find connections between the objects.  Their task, after studying an exhibit and thinking about what types of connections objects could have, is to choose three that connect, add a historical photo, and present their mini museum.  Frustration is common but so is the “Aha!” moment!  This group embraced the challenge – and one group gave me goose bumps!  This  group had placed a book, a bell and a pen and had come up with the connection of ‘School’.  “True, but not very interesting” I told them and then left them to think more deeply. photo (3)

When they presented their story, the objects were the bell, a telegraph machine, a pen and a photo of an avalanche shed over a railroad.  Their title was Communication: tools for disaster.

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The bell was to communicate to all around about the danger.  The telegraph, to communicate to those down the rail line and far away and the pen was to communicate to your loved ones and tell them you were safe.  Wow.  Interesting, connected and a great story starter!