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Welcome!

Jeff de Boer, 'Cyclone', 2006

Jeff de Boer, ‘Cyclone’, 2006

 

We have lift off!  Originally, we were going to create a simple blog where we could share articles we were reading, ideas that inspired us and pictures we liked.  But, like most things, what started as a simple idea morphed into a space where ideas could be shared and discussed, pictures and journal entries could be posted, objects could be studied and people and could be introduced. We hope this space becomes a virtual meeting place where you can share your successes, ask for assistance and see some of the awesome things going on @Glenbow!

Posts, like this one, show up at the bottom third of the page. Click on any to read.  Please comment! All comments and content are moderated so if you comment it won’t show up immediately.  If you want to narrow your search, check the very bottom of the page where you will see a group of words titled, ‘Categories’.  Click on any of those headings to narrow your content to only those posts that have something to do with that word.  If you have something you would like to share, contact us at mmccormack@glenbow.org and become a ‘Guest Poster’!

Just above the ‘Posts’ is a carousel of pictures.  This is where you will find mystery objects to click on and discover as well as articles about some of the amazing people that we work with at Glenbow.  Click on the beautiful turquoise case in this section for an article about our Cultural History Technician, Marcia Slater. This carousel of pictures will be constantly added to and if you want to narrow your search in this section, check the bottom of the home page, and next to ‘Categories’ you will see a group of words called ‘Projects’.  This will narrow your search in this field.

Above the Carousel are the big pictures.  These can also be clicked on for a description or possibly a story!

Also on the bottom left of the Home page, you will see our Museum School Twitter feed.  Please follow us @museumschoolYYC.

We also realized there was a need to simplify our questionnaire process.  You can now access the questionnaire for teachers and adults and submit it online.  In the Menu at the top of the page is a ‘Teacher’ category.  In the drop down menu you will see a title for Forms. In this drop down menu you will see both a ‘Teacher’ and ‘Adult’ questionnaire.  At the bottom of the ‘Teacher Questionnaire’ there is a place to drag and drop files, allowing you to share some of the wonderful photos and journal entries from your week with us.  The ‘Your Ideas’ menu item in this category is set up as a forum and you will have to create a password protected log in  identity.  Sign up just below the ‘Log in” button where you see the word, ‘Register’.  This is another opportunity to share museum school ideas, techniques and queries.

This web page would not exist without the wonderful, continued support of Chevron Canada Resources, our incredible, talented tech wizard Natasha Ivanco and Chris Heazell, Manager, Information Systems at Glenbow, who found us this space to play! Thank you all!

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My Summer Holiday

IMG_2113I went to New York for the first time in my life this summer. It was everything I had imagined. Loud, exhilarating, overwhelming and wonderful! We at Museum School had the amazing good fortune of participating in the Lincoln Center Institute International Educator’s Workshop. This was an immersive week of arts education that challenged your thinking and opened your mind to new ways of engaging students with art through aesthetic education and imaginative learning. The framework that all of this connects to and jumps from are the Capacities for Imaginative Learning.

As the name suggests, the workshop took place at the Lincoln Center in the Julliard School. The Lincoln Center is comprised of three theatres, including the Metropolitan Opera, a museum and performing space, reflecting pool with a massive Henry Moore sculpture and the Julliard School. The workshop was facilitated by three Teaching Artists, an actor, a dancer and a visual artist. Fundamentally important to the Lincoln Center’s methodology is that students need to be involved with ‘live’ art – be that a performance or a visual piece. This is where our situation at Glenbow is ideal!

Embodying the Capacities

Henry Moore, Reclining Figure, 1965

Though the workshop is primarily aimed at classroom teachers and school administrators, the concept of using art for imaginative learning is also ideally suited to museum education.  The Lincoln Center’s philosopher in residence, Maxine Greene, sums it up with one of her many fantastic quotes, “Without imagination, you live in a small room with the windows closed. Imagination opens the windows and shows us landscapes, horizons that we would not otherwise perceive…I want education to empower people to see possibility.”

Dancers

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Student bloggers – more stuff in the crowded day?

IMG_2234Neil Gaimon in his lecture, “Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming.” argues that it isn’t so much what our children read, it is the opening up of space so they have time to read and read whatever they want.  That is the way to create readers and critical thinkers.  So, where does a blog fit into this?  I think writing has to be  part of  this discussion.  A critical thinker must also be able to illustrate their ideas and writing is where this happens.  This is the era of self publishing and thousands of blogs hit cyberspace everyday. In my own life, I reluctantly admit, I read more blogs than books now and if getting kids to read more means getting them to read anything, this might be one answer.  Blogs can be fiction, poetry,  art, music, science, current events – and they can be accessed by parents and students. In this blog post, Bill Ferriter offers some simple, straight forward methods for publishing classroom blogs.

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Art Museum Education

I took a workshop from Mike Murawski while at a Project Zero Conference in Atlanta, Georgia. It was focussed on multidisciplinary viewing of art – movement, sound, journaling, etc. We worked with a Jackson Pollock work for over an hour – and we could have doubled that! I think the blog that he moderates really addresses the style of learning we love – slow down, look deeply, form your own meaning. It is aimed at museum educators but really, we are all in the same boat.

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Art Museum Teaching
www.artmuseumteaching.com