Tag Archives: teachers

New Forum – Review your Journal

ahhh… the eternal quest… for the perfect journal.

Is it easier to write in your journal if you actually like it? Does it matter if your journal falls apart before it’s full? Soft cover or hard, which do you prefer?

These are the questions we sometimes grapple with, and we know you’re pondering this too. Personally, I’m not very good with these types of details, I’m a bit of a utilitarian in some ways, so I’m more interested in the supply chain than most of the other details.

But generally, we know that there are some benefits and drawbacks (and some fatal flaws) to different journal designs. We recommend that you use something coil bound, with a hard cover so it can be easily carted around and written in while standing or maybe sitting on a carpeted floor.

Lately though, we’ve seen the same white coil bound books. If you look at your Journey into Journalling (I forget why the extra L – it’s on purpose though) book, on page 8 you’ll see the main problem with these… the coil pops out. Magically. ;)

I find them a bit big myself. But I’m not the end user here – your students are. If you think they are “magically” inclined i.e. they are likely to methodically work a coil out of place until they have a dangerous eye poking spring  and a wild collection of loose papers, you might want to consider a different journal.

But which one?

I’m hoping that we can compare notes. If you happen to be a journal writer, or if you’ve found the perfect book (or the imperfect one) in your work with students, please head on over to the forums and post a review. We’d love to know what your journey into Journalling has taught you about… well… the journal.

Making an impact

Did you know that there have been studies of the long term impact of Open Minds sites? (Maybe I already mentioned it)

Gillian Kydd, who pioneered the program made a video recording of students who participated in Zoo school 7 years earlier. Through that experience we learned some interesting (if slightly anecdotal) things, including:

- Students remember tactile and sensory things (like smells and playing with snow)

-Students don’t often recall programs, or activities that they did. They remember the things they saw more than the tasks they completed

- Upon reflection, the students realized that the experience taught them that there were more ways to learn than the “classroom method” and that these other ways were valid and important

- Each participant shared their intended career path, and attributed that path to something they learned at Zoo School (so the learning is deep, and the lessons are sustained although perhaps not immediately recognizable)

And…

- Students totally forget facilitators, but they have strong memories of their teacher and parents (if they participated) from that time.

This idea is well established in research – emotion and learning are closely connected and student teacher bonds are an important part of student success.

 

But don’t worry – we don’t get down on ourselves because we’re ultimately forgotten! Because for the brief period that your students are here, we know we’ve captured their attention.

Thank you Marnie! from Nakoda AV Club on Vimeo.

 

 

Welcome Back!

Every year in fall we seem to write a post that goes something like… “wow fall again already…” which is partially about us being excited about a new year with you, and partially about us feeling guilty that all our big plans for the blog last year didn’t …. Ahem…. Materialize? (See how I made that objective there – took my own responsibility right out of the mix… museums can be good at that) ;)

Anyways… this year we’re going to try again.

Our aim with this virtual space is really just to share interesting things we’ve come across that we think may be of some use to your journey of your museum school year. But we know that you’re busy people, and we’re busy people, and we just don’t want to waste time putting out information that doesn’t seem useful. So… We’d love your help. Anytime you’ve got an interest in something that you think we could explore, do you mind letting us know? Perhaps an issue you’ve come across in classroom, or a topic you think we might have some knowledge about, or even just something related to arts and culture that you’ve always wanted to know? We won’t blow your cover – feel free to ask questions anonymously. Or on the flip side, maybe you want to be a guest blogger for us? This is a journey that we’re all on together. Just like in your classroom, the more voices that are here the more rich our learning together will be.

Looking forward to trying again this year & welcome back to school to you all!

Amanda